Hardwood Lumber

 

Acadian Cypress & Hardwoods specialized in offering a complete inventory of hardwood lumber, domestic, imported & exotic. All Hardwoods are stocked in the rough, but can be milled to your desired specifications by our mill. Our lumber product line is designed to primarily compliment our hardwood plywood line by offering a wide array of wood species and size configurations. With over 26 years of experience, Acadian Cypress & Hardwoods has access to the finest hardwood mills throughout North America providing you, our valued customer, quality, selection and the best value in hardwood lumber available anywhere.
 

Domestic Lumber Species

Alder

Alder

(Alnus rubra)

Wood is whitish when first sawn, aging to a light honey brown, straight grained, moderately light. Grain pattern similar to Black Cherry. Often termed West Coast Cherry. Alder has its own grading rules that differ from the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA) standard grading rules. Also, Alder is Hit-or-Miss (HorM) meaning that factory surfacing is to a thickness greater than “Standard Surface Thickness”. HorM surfacing may leave rough areas on on both faces of a board

Weight – 2.8lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Pacific Coast Alder, Western Alder, Oregon Alder

Working Properties – Excellent for turning and polishing; takes glue, paint & stain well

Durability – Rated slightly or non-resistant to heartwood decay.

Uses – Core stock for plywood, Cabinets, Furniture

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Superior Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Cabinet Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Rustic Grade RWL KD
Aromatic Cedar

Aromatic Cedar

(Juniperus virginiana)

Heartwood tends to be a reddish or violet-brown. Sapwood is a pale yellow color, and can be appear throughout the heartwood as streaks and stripes. Has a straight grain, usually with knots present. Has a very fine texture with closed pores.

Weight – 3.3lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Aromatic Red Cedar, Eastern Red Cedar

Working Properties – Overall, Aromatic Red Cedar is easy to work, notwithstanding any knots or irregularities present in the wood. It reportedly has a high silica content, which can dull cutters. Aromatic Red Cedar glues and finishes well, though in many applications, the wood is left unfinished to preserve its aromatic properties.

Durability – Regarded as excellent in resistance to both decay and insect attack, Aromatic Red Cedar is frequently used for fence posts used in direct ground contact with no pre-treating of the wood.

Uses – fence posts, closet and chest linings, carvings, outdoor furniture, pencils, bows, and small wooden specialty items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 Prime Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 Rustic Grade RWL KD
Ash

Ash

(Fraxinus Americana)

Very hard and strong, with flexibility and a texture of “tough”, “soft”, or “medium”, depending on the source of origin. Tough Ash is more brown and grows in the Northern Appalachian region. The soft/medium texture is whiter or creamier in color and is prominent in the Southern regions.

Weight – 4.4lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –White Ash, American White Ash

Working Properties – Easy to work, and takes glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Heartwood is rated as perishable, or only slightly durable in regard to decay. Ash is also not resistant to insect attack.

Uses – flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Basswood

Basswood

(Tilia Americana)

Basswood is also known as Linnwood, or Linn and is prominent in the northeast region of the U.S. Basswood is reddish brown (heartwood) or white (sapwood) in color, porous in grain texture and very light and soft, making it easily worked and very stable. It is well suited for carvings, mouldings, cabinets & paints well. Basswood is known as the “softie” of the hardwoods. By this, it is meant, that although Basswood is a hardwood (botanically), it is very soft in weight…about one half the weight of Red Oak.

Weight – 2.7lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Basswood, American Basswood, Basstree, Spoonwood, Linn, Linden

Working Properties – Easy to work, being very soft and light. Perhaps one of the most suitable wood species for hand carving. Basswood also glues and finishes well.

Durability – Basswood is rated as being non-durable in regard to heartwood decay.

Uses – carvings, decoys, lumber, veneer, plywood, caskets, and wood pulp and fiber products.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4 & 8/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Birch

Birch

(Betula alleghaniensis)

Birch is moderately heavy and is strong and hard. It grows in southeastern Canada, the Lake States, New England, & the Appalachian region as far south as Georgia. Natural color contains both sapwood (white color) and heartwood (red color) or you can purchase “Saps” Birch that is white one face. “Red Birch” (red one face) is also available upon request.

Weight – 4.6lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Yellow Birch, White Birch, Swamp Witch Hazel

Working Properties – Generally easy to work with hand and machine tools, though boards with wild grain can cause grain tearout during machining operations. Turns, glues, and finishes well.

Durability – Birch is perishable, and will readily rot and decay if exposed to the elements. The wood is also susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – Birch is one of the most widely used woods for veneer and plywood worldwide. Besides regular sheets of plywood, Birch veneer is also used for doors, furniture, and paneling. Some other common uses for Birch include: boxes, crates, turned objects, interior trim, and other small specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
Cherry

Cherry

(Prunus serotina)

Cherry is one of the most beautiful and expensive U.S. Hardwoods. Geography is important to Cherry’s color. Appalachian Cherry, which is grown in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York, has developed a reputation for having the best veneer quality and relatively gum-free Cherry. Southern Cherry is generally harvested from the southern region of the U.S. It is generally browner in color than Appalachian Cherry and the grain tends to be courser due to the longer and faster growing season in the South. Cherry is porous with an indistinct grain pattern and is of medium hardness. Color ranges from light to dark and red or white. It is said that Cherry’s colors can quickly be darkened and aged by exposing it to direct sunlight.

Weight – 3.7lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Wild Black Cherry, Cherry, American Cherry, Whiskey Cherry, Cabinet Cherry

Working Properties – Cherry is known as being one of the best all-around woods for workability. It is stable, straight-grained, and machines well. The only difficulties typically arise if the wood is being stained, as it can sometimes give blotchy results due to its fine, closed pores.

Durability – Heartwood is rated as being very durable and resistant to decay.

Uses – Fine furniture construction, Millwork, Patterns, Piano Actions, and turned items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 x 8″ & Wider Select & Better Grade RL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Hickory

Hickory

(Carya ovate)

If you are looking for strength, hardness and durability; Hickory is the best commercially available wood North America. It is uniform, with a fine grain pattern and of medium weight. Hickory has a coarse texture, with a great deal of color variation (known as Calico) between creamy white color (sapwood) and reddish brown (heartwood).

Weight – 5.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Shagbark Hickory, Wild Pecan, Bitter Pecan

Working Properties – Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Considered to be non-durable to perishable regarding heartwood decay, and also very susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – Furniture, Millwork, Flooring, tool handles, ladder rungs, wheel spokes, flooring, etc

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Maple – Hard

Maple – Hard

(Acer saccharum)

Hard Maple is also referred to as Sugar Maple and Rock Maple. Hard Maple uses include furniture, decorative inlays, and bowling alley lanes. Maple grows throughout the Eastern U.S, with the exception of the South Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains. It is brown to light tan or white in color with diffuse, porous and indistinct grain patter.

Weight – 4.4lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Hard Maple, Sugar Maple, Rock Maple

Working Properties – Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Durability – Being that the sapwood of maple is used, and not the heartwood, it is non-durable to perishable in regard to decay resistance.

Uses – flooring (from basketball courts and dance-floors to bowling alleys and residential), veneer, pulpwood, musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and other turned objects and specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Maple – PC

Maple – PC

(Acer macrophyllum)

From the Northwest Region of the U.S., this species accounts for almost 5% of the timber resource on the west coast. PC Maple closely resembles Pennsylvania Cherry in both color and texture. However, PC Maple more resembles Alder than Maple, therefore it is graded the same as Alder in the NHLA rules book.

Weight – 3.4lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Bigleaf Maple

Working Properties – Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Durability – Rated as non-durable to perishable in regard to decay resistance

Uses – Great substitute for Maple & Alder, veneer, pulpwood, boxes, crates/pallets, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
Maple – Soft

Maple – Soft

(Acer rubrum)

Soft Maple has many of the same characteristics of Hard Maple, but not nearly as hard or strong. Soft Maple is into Red Maple (red leaf) and Silver Maple (silver leaf). Soft Maple is harvested throughout the Eastern U.S., with the exception of the South Atlantic and the Gulf Coastal Plains. Natural color combines both sapwood (white color) and heartwood (red color).

Weight – 3.8lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Red Maple

Working Properties – Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Durability – Rated as non-durable to perishable in regard to decay resistance.

Uses – Furniture, Cabinet & Millwork, veneer, pulpwood, boxes, crates/pallets, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Select & Better Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 90% White One Face Select & Better Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Pecan

Pecan

(Carya illinoinensis)

Somewhat lighter and easier to work than Hickory, Pecan has a moderate grain pattern, reddish brown heartwood and white sapwood. Pecan is very hard and is an excellent choice for flooring. Pecan belongs to the same botanical family as Walnut and possesses a similar grain appearance. Pecan is generally harvested in the Southern Region of the U.S.

Weight – 4.6lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Sweet Pecan, Hickory

Working Properties – Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Considered to be non-durable to perishable regarding heartwood decay, and also very susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – Tool Handles, Furniture, Cabinets, Skis

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Pine – Eastern White

Pine – Eastern White

(Pinus strobus)

Eastern White Pine is one of the most common and widely used timbers for construction lumber in the northeast United States. The long, straight trunks of Eastern White Pine were once prized for use as ship masts. The king of England’s aggravating habit of marking out and reserving all the biggest and best of these trees for use in his navy lead to the Pine Tree Riot of 1772, and played a role in the events leading up to the Revolutionary War.

Weight – 2.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Eastern White Pine

Working Properties – Eastern White Pine is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Glues and finishes well.

Durability – The heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance.

Uses – crates, boxes, interior millwork, furniture, construction lumber, carving, and boatbuilding.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 Furniture Grade Knotty White Pine RWL KD
  • 4/4 & 6/4 D & Btr Eastern White Pine RWL KD
Pine – Sugar

Pine – Sugar

(Pinus lambertiana)

Sugar Pine is the largest of all species of pine, attaining heights of over 200 feet; it’s sheer size, coupled with its thick and massive branches, have lead some botanists to also describe it as the most majestic species of pine as well. Sugar Pine is significantly lighter and weaker than the species of Southern Yellow Pine, though it has excellent dimensional stability, and is frequently used in the production of patterns/templates and applications where stability is important.

Weight – 2.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Sugar Pine

Working Properties – Sugar Pine is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Glues and finishes well.

Durability – The heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance.

Uses – crates, boxes, interior millwork, patterns, construction lumber, and musical instruments (piano keys).

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 #2 Common RWL KD
  • 6/4 & 8/4 x 12 #2 Common Sugar Pine RL KD
Pine – Yellow

Pine – Yellow

(Pinus taeda)

Loblolly Pine is considered to be in the group of southern yellow pines, and shares many characteristics with other species of this group (Longleaf, Shortleaf, and Slash Pine) such as being: hard, dense, and possessing an excellent strength-to-weight ratio.

Weight –3.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Loblolly Pine

Working Properties – Overall, Yellow Pine works fairly well with most tools, and it glues and finishes well.

Durability – The heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance.

Uses – construction, such as: stringers, roof trusses, poles, joists, piles; as well as interior applications such as subflooring and sheathing and millwork

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 1×6 Sel & Btr Yellow Pine RL KD
  • 1×8 Sel & Btr Yellow Pine RL KD
Poplar

Poplar

(Liriodendron tulipifera)

Poplar is very porous, lightweight, & diffuse. Sapwood is whitish is color and heartwood is yellowish green with a very light weight and fine grain pattern. True Poplars (Genus Populus) include Aspen, Carolona Poplar and Cottonwood, but not Yellow Poplar. Yellow Poplar is a member of the Magnolia family and is preferably called the Tulip Tree or Tulip Poplar

Weight – 3.2lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Poplar, Tulip Poplar, Yellow Poplar, Blue Poplar, White Poplar

Working Properties – Very easy to work in almost all regards, one of Poplar’s only downsides is its softness. Due to its low density, Poplar can sometimes leave fuzzy surfaces and edges: especially during shaping or sanding. Sanding to finer grits of sandpaper may be necessary to obtain a smooth surface.

Durability – Heartwood is rated as being moderately durable to non-durable in regards to decay resistance.

Uses – pallets, crates, upholstered furniture frames, pulpwood, and plywood. Poplar veneer is also used for a variety of applications: either dyed in various colors, or on hidden undersides of veneered panels to counteract the pull of the glue on an exposed side that has been veneered with another, more decorative wood species.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, & 16/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 x 10″ & wider FAS1F Grade RL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common Grade RWL KD
Red Oak – Appalachian

Red Oak – Appalachian

(Quercus rubra)

In early 2000, the oaks (red and white) were named America’s National Tree by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Red Oak is the most important and prevalent species in the U.S. Pinkish cast heartwood and somewhat stronger grain pattern than White Oak. Sapwood is white in color. Appalachian Red Oak is harvested in the Northeastern Region of the U.S.

Weight – 4.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –American Red Oak, Cherrybark Red Oak

Working Properties – Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.

Durability – Falls somewhere between slightly durable to non-durable. Red Oaks do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oak possesses.

Uses – Widely used in cabinet and furniture making.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 Rift & Quartered Sel & Btr RWL KD
  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD
  • 4/4 x 12″ & Wider FAS1F RL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common RWL KD
Red Oak – Southern

Red Oak – Southern

(Quercus falcate)

Southern Red Oak falls into the red oak group, and shares many of the same traits as Appalachian Red Oak. Red Oak, along with its brother White Oak, is commonly used domestic lumber species. Hard, strong, and moderately priced, Red Oak presents an exceptional value to woodworkers—which explains why it is so widely used in cabinet and furniture making. Southern Red Oak is harvested in the Southern Region of the U.S.

Weight – 4.3lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Southern Red Oak, Spanish Oak, Hill Red Oak

Working Properties – Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.

Durability – Red oaks such as Southern Red Oak do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oaks possess. Durability should be considered minimal.

Uses – widely used in cabinet and furniture making.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 FAS1F RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common RWL KD
Walnut


Walnut

(Juglans nigra)

Heavy, hard, strong wood, rather coarse grained, very durable, rich brown color. Sapwood is white unless the wood is steam treated. Most woods darken with age; Walnut is the exception and becomes lighter in color with age.

Weight – 4.1lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Black Walnut, American Walnut

Working Properties – Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Planer tearout can sometimes be a problem when surfacing pieces with irregular or figured grain. Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained).

Durability – Black Walnut is rated as very durable in terms of decay resistance, though it is susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – furniture, cabinets, gunstocks, interior paneling, veneer, turned items, and other small wooden objects and novelties.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common RWL KD
White Oak

White Oak

(Quercus alba)

White Oak, along with its brother Red Oak, are commonly used domestic lumber species. Hard, durable, and moderately priced, White Oak presents an exceptional value to woodworkers. Wherever water is present, in conditions such as boat parts and exterior windows and doors, White Oak should always be used…NEVER Red Oak. The heartwood of White Oak is filled with extractives known as “Tyloses” that make White Oak extremely weather resistant. Light brown heartwood, prominent wood rays and strong grain pattern. More restricted in production than Red Oak.

Weight – 5.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Fork-leafed White Oak, West Virginia White

Working Properties – Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.
Durability – Good rot resistance: frequently used in boat-building applications.

Uses – widely used in cabinet and furniture making, marine applications, millwork.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 Rift & Quartered Sel & Btr RWL KD
  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD
  • 4/4 #1 Common RWL KD
Willow

Willow

(Salix nigra)

Willow is one of the softest American Hardwoods. It saws and machines easily, but the wood is inclined to be a little fuzzy and requires sanding. It is soft, light weight and very stable, with a light tan sapwood and a red to grayish brown heartwood. When stained, Willow is known as a great look alike for Walnut.

Weight – 5.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Black Willow, Swamp Willow, Dudley Willow

Working Properties – With its low density and interlocked grain, willow has very poor machining characteristics, frequently resulting in fuzzy surfaces or tearout. Willow also tends to develop numerous drying defects and can be difficult to season. Glues and finishes well.

Durability – Rated as non-durable to perishable, and also susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – baskets, utility wood, crates, furniture, carvings, and other small specialty wood items.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • Call for Availability

Import Lumber Species

African Mahogany

African Mahogany

(Khaya ivorensis)

African Mahogany in the Khaya genus is considered to be a valid substitute for Honduran Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), otherwise known as “Genuine Mahogany.” Heartwood is a reddish brown, also exhibiting an optical phenomenon known as chatoyancy. Has a medium to coarse texture with open pores. The grain can be straight, irregular, or interlocked. Timbers are harvested from West Tropic Africa.

Weight – 4.3lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –African Mahogany

Working Properties – Easy to work, glue, and finish. Tearout can sometimes be a problem if the grain is interlocked.

Durability – Rated as moderately durable, with resistance to termites, but vulnerable to beetles.

Uses – plywood, turned items, furniture, boat-building, and interior trim.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, & 16/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Beech

Beech

(Fagus sylvatica)

European Beech is readily available an consist of over 57% of Germany’s hardwood forest. European Beech is pale cream to pale brown and is steamed to relieve drying stresses, while also bringing out a pinkish-red color. Beech is an important and widely-used hardwood in Europe. Its hardness, wear-resistance, strength, and excellent bending capabilities—coupled with its low price—make this hardwood a mainstay for many European woodworkers. Depending on soil conditions, European Beech can grow to very large sizes, and wide, long lumber is commonly available for use.

Weight – 4.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –European Beech

Working Properties – Overall, Beech has a good workability, and compares fairly closely to Hard Maple in many aspects. It machines well, and glues, finishes, and turns well. It does, however, have a large amount of movement in service, as evidenced by its large shrinkage numbers, so movement and wood stability must be taken into account for projects involving Beech.

Durability – Beech is considered non-durable or perishable; it is also susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – lumber, veneer, flooring, boat-building, furniture, cabinetry, musical instruments (piano pinblocks), plywood, and turned objects.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 Superior Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 Sup Color Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 Sup Red Heart Grade RWL KD
  • 4/4 Rustic Grade RWL KD
Genuine Mahogany

Genuine Mahogany

(Swietenia macrophylla)

Honduran Mahogany goes by many names, yet perhaps its most accurate and telling name is Genuine Mahogany. Not to be confused with cheaper imitations, such as Philippine Mahogany, Swietenia macrophylla is what most consider to be the real and true species when referring to “Mahogany.” An incredibly important commercial timber in Latin America, Honduran Mahogany is now grown extensively on plantations. It has been widely exploited, leading to its inclusion on the CITES Appendix II in 2003. In effect, this limits the international exporting of the lumber to certified sustainable sources. (This is also why many lumber retailers located in the United States are unable to ship Honduran Mahogany outside of the country.) Substitutes sometimes used are African Mahogany or Sapele.

Weight – 4.1lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Honduran Mahogany, Honduras Mahogany, American Mahogany, Genuine Mahogany, Big-Leaf Mahogany, Brazilian Mahogany

Working Properties – Typically very easy to work with tools: machines well. (With exception to sections with figured grain, which can tearout or chip during machining.) Slight dulling of cutters can occur. Sands very easily. Turns, glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Considered durable or very durable in regards to decay resistance, though it has been reported as being susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – furniture, cabinetry, turned objects, veneers, musical instruments, boat-building, and carving.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Jatoba

Jatoba

(Hymenaea courbaril)

Although it’s widely named “Brazilian Cherry,” (mostly among flooring sellers), it bears absolutely no relation to the domestic Cherry (Prunus serotina) that is found in the US, except perhaps that its natural color closely matches the common stained color of domestic Cherry that has been aged/stained reddish-brown as seen on some interior furniture. Jatoba is exceptionally stiff, strong, and hard—among the very toughest of all timbers worldwide. Wood can vary in color, from a lighter orange-brown, to a darker reddish brown, which tends to become darker with age. The grain patterns are usually bland and undefined, though the wood has a certain depth of luster that’s hard to define. There are sometimes contrasting darker grayish brown streaks or curly figure found in certain boards.

Weight – 6.2lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Jatoba, Brazilian Cherry

Working Properties – Jatoba is considered difficult to work with on account of its density and hardness, and has a moderate blunting effect on tool cutters. Jatoba also tends to be difficult to plane without tearout due to its interlocking grain. However, Jatoba glues, stains, and finishes well, and also turns well on the lathe.

Durability – Jatoba is rated as being very durable in regards to rot resistance, and is also resistant to termites and most other insects. (Though it has been reported to be susceptible to attack from marine borers.)

Uses – flooring, furniture, cabinetry, tool handles, shipbuilding, railroad ties, turned objects, and other small specialty items.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Lyptus

Lyptus

(Eucalyptus urograndis)

Lyptus® is merely a trade name, which is a registered trademark owned by the Brazilian company Aracruz Produtos de Madeira (APM). The Lyptus® brand is marketed in the United States by Weyerhaeuser. The actual tree species, which is grown on Brazilian plantations owned by APM, is a Eucalyptus hybrid of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla. In terms of mechanical/physical characteristics, Lyptus® has a very high shrinkage rate, and is likely to experience a fair amount of seasonal movement. The wood is relatively hard, heavy, and strong, though as a general rule, the paler pinkish brown boards tend to be less dense, while the darker reddish brown boards tend to be heavier and harder.

Weight – 5.3lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Lyptus®

Working Properties – JGenerally easy to work, though it can burn easily. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Mixed reports, with most sources rating the heartwood as moderately durable in regard to decay resistance, though it is susceptible to insect attack

Uses – flooring, lumber, interior millwork, cabinetry, plywood, and turned objects.
Available Products:

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Purpleheart

Purpleheart

(Peltogyne spp.)

Mechanical data was compiled and averaged out from three species within the Peltogyne genus: (Peltogyne paniculata, P. porphyrocardia, and P. venosa). Even taking the average of these numbers, Purpleheart ranks among the very stiffest and strongest woods in the world. When freshly cut the heartwood of Purpleheart is a dull grayish/purplish brown. Upon exposure the wood becomes a deeper eggplant purple. With further age and exposure to UV light, the wood becomes a dark brown with a hint of purple. This color-shift can be slowed and minimized by using a UV inhibiting finish on the wood.

Weight – 6.1lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Purpleheart, Amaranth

Working Properties – Working with Purpleheart can present some unique challenges: if the wood is heated with dull tools, or if cutter speeds are too high, Purpleheart will exude a gummy resin that can clog tools and complicate the machining process. Depending on the grain orientation, can be difficult to plane without tearout. Purpleheart also has a moderate dulling effect on cutters.

Durability – Purpleheart is rated as being very durable, and resists both decay and most insect attacks, though it has been reported to be susceptible to attack from marine borers.

Uses – Uses – boat-building, flooring, furniture, heavy construction, and a variety of specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 6/4, & 8/4 FAS1F Grade RWL KD
Sapele

Sapele

(Entandrophragma cylindricum)

Sapele is a commonly imported wood species both in lumber and veneer form. It is sometimes used as a substitute for Genuine Mahogany, and is sometimes referred to as “Sapele Mahogany,” though it bears no real relation to either Swietenia or Khaya genera. Medium to dark reddish brown or purplish brown. Color tends to darken with age. Besides the common ribbon pattern seen on quartersawn boards, Sapele is also known for a wide variety of other figured grain patterns, such as: pomelle, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback.

Weight – 4.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Sapele

Working Properties –Sapele can be troublesome to work in some machining operations, (i.e., planing, routing, etc.), resulting in tearout due to its interlocked grain. It will also react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Sapele has a slight blunting effect on cutters, but it turns, glues, and finishes well.

Durability – Heartwood ranges from moderately durable to very durable in regard to decay resistance. Sapele is susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 Flat Sawn & Quartered RWL KD
  • 5/4 Flat Sawn & Quartered RWL KD
  • 6/4 Flat Sawn & Quartered RWL KD
  • 8/4 Flat Sawn & Quartered RWL KD
Spanish Cedar


Spanish Cedar

(Cedrela odorata)

A historically valuable Latin-American timber, Spanish Cedar has been exploited in many regions, and the species is now considered to be “vulnerable” (VU) according to IUCN’s Red List. It’s also listed on the CITES Appendix III for the countries of Columbia, Guatemala, and Peru. (It’s listing in Appendix III simply means that the countries listed have voluntarily chosen to control the exporting of the wood, and have sought the cooperation of other countries to help in enforcing these restrictions.) Spanish Cedar may still be freely exported from other Latin American countries not listed in Appendix III. Spanish Cedar is closely related to true Mahoganies (Swietenia and Khaya genera), as both are in the Meliaceae family. Density and mechanical properties can vary widely depending on country of origin and growing conditions; (specific gravity can vary from .30 to as high as .60 in some instances). Some of the wood available at present comes from plantations: where younger, faster-growing trees, produce wood that is lower in density, and paler in color than wood cut from trees taken from forests in the wild.

Weight – 3.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Spanish Cedar, Cedro

Working Properties –Spanish Cedar is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. However, due to its low density and softness, Spanish Cedar tends to leave fuzzy surfaces if not machined with sharp cutters; extra sanding up to finer grits may be required to obtain a smooth wood surface. Also, natural gum pockets can remain wet and may ooze out onto the surrounding surface, which can clog and gum up saw blades, and make finishing the wood a challenge.

Durability – Spanish Cedar ranges from durable to moderately durable regarding decay resistance, and is also resistant to termite attack; the wood is also reported to have excellent weathering characteristics. Older, slower-growing trees from the wild tend to produce wood that is more durable than wood from younger, plantation-grown trees.

Uses – veneer, plywood, cabinetry, millwork, musical instruments, (flamenco and classical guitars), humidors, and boatbuilding.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, & 12/4 Sel & Btr RWL KD
Teak

Teak

(Tectona grandis)

Used extensively in India and within its natural range for centuries, Teak has grown into a worldwide favorite. With its superb stability, good strength properties, easy workability—and most of all, its outstanding resistance to decay and rot—it’s no wonder that Teak ranks among the most desired lumbers in the world. Heartwood tends to be a golden or medium brown, with color darkening with age.

Weight – 4.1lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Teak, Burmese Teak

Working Properties –Easy to work in nearly all regards, with the only caveat being that Teak contains a high level of silica (up to 1.4%) which has a pronounced blunting effect on cutting edges. Despite its natural oils, Teak usually glues and finishes well, though in some instances it may be necessary to wipe the surface of the wood with a solvent prior to gluing/finishing to reduce the natural oils on the surface of the wood.

Durability – Teak has been considered by many to be the gold standard for decay resistance, and its heartwood is rated as very durable. Teak is also resistant to termites, though it is only moderately resistant to marine borers and powder post beetles.

Uses – ship and boat-building, veneer, furniture, exterior construction, carving, turnings, and other small wood objects.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 FEQ RWL KD

Exotic Lumber Species

Afromosia

Afromosia

(Pericopsis elata)

Along with Iroko, Afrormosia is sometimes referred to as “African Teak,” though it is not closely related to genuine Teak (Tectona grandis). Afrormosia does look somewhat similar to Teak, has similar working and mechanical properties, and is extremely durable in outdoor applications; for these reasons, it’s used with a fair degree of success as a substitute for Teak.

Weight – 4.5lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Afrormosia, Afromosia, African Teak

Working Properties –In nearly all regards, Afrormosia is easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though surfacing boards with interlocking grain may cause tearout. Other downsides include a slight blunting effect on cutting edges, and the development of dark stains if left in contact with iron in damp conditions. Afrormosia turns, glues, stains, and finishes well.

Durability – Rated as very durable regarding decay resistance, and is also resistant to termites and other insects.

Uses – boatbuilding, veneer, flooring, and furniture.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 Sel & Btr RWL KD
Anigre 

Anigre

(Aningeria spp)

Heartwood is a light yellowish-brown, sometimes with a pinkish hue. Color tends to darken to a more golden brown with age. Has a medium texture with closed pores similar to maple. Growth rings aren’t always well-defined, and the wood can be rather plain-looking; though certain figure is occasionally present, such as curly or mottled grain. Anigre is frequently sliced and sold as veneer.

Weight – 3.2 lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names –Anigre, Anegre, Aniegre, Aningeria

Working Properties –Overall working characteristics are fair, though depending on the species used, Anigre may have silica present and therefore have a blunting effect on tools.

Durability – Rated as non-durable to perishable. Not resistant to insect attack.

Uses – It’s commonly used for plywood and interior furniture; in board form it’s used for boatbuilding, general carpentry, and other light construction uses.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 FEQ RWL KD
Bocote 

Bocote

(Cordia spps)

With its striking, zebra-like contrasts, and bold figuring, Bocote can be a very eye-catching wood. Bookmatching two consecutive panels can create symmetrical”faces” and other patterns in the wood, (though a relatively thin-kerf blade should be used to minimize the shift of the pattern). Bocote is generally used for its aesthetic attributes, rather than its mechanical ones—and although Bocote is by no means weak, its strength-to-weight ratio is below average. Most species come from Mexico and Central/South America, though certain species occur in Africa

Weight – 5.9lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Bocote

Working Properties –Some species may contain silica that will dull cutters. On the whole, Bocote is easily worked and machined with good results. Although Bocote has a fairly high amount of natural oils present, gluing is usually problem-free.

Durability – Heartwood is rated from moderately durable to very durable depending on the species; it is susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – fine furniture, cabinetry, flooring, veneer, boat-building, musical instruments, gunstocks, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 2″ x 2″ Blanks RL
Bubinga 

Bubinga

(Guibourtia spp)

Bubinga has a close resemblance to rosewood, and is often use in place of more expensive woods. Yet Bubinga also features a host of stunning grain figures, such as flamed, pommele, and waterfall, which make this wood truly unique. Bubinga also has an exceptional strength-to-weight ratio. Heartwood ranges from a pinkish red to a darker reddish brown with darker purple or black streaks. Sapwood is a pale straw color and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood.

Weight – 5.8lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Bubinga

Working Properties – Easy to work overall, though depending upon the species Bubinga can have silica present, which can prematurely dull cutting edges. Also, on pieces with figured or interlocking grain, tearout can occur during planing or other machining operations. Gluing can occasionally be problematic due to Bubinga’s high density and natural oils. Turns and finishes well.

Durability – Ranges from moderately durable to very durable depending upon the the species. Bubinga is also reported to be resistant to termite and marine borer attack.

Uses – veneer, inlays, fine furniture, cabinetry, turnings, and other specialty items. Since Bubinga trees can grow so large, natural-edge slabs of the wood have also been used in tabletops and other specialized projects.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD
Canarywood 

Canarywood

(Centrolobium spp.)

Some pieces of Canarywood can be almost rainbow colored—with dark red streaks, along with the natural orange, yellow, and brown coloration. Heartwood color can vary a fair amount, from a pale yellow-orange to a darker reddish brown, usually with darker streaks throughout. The color tends to darken with age. Has a medium texture and small pores. The grain is typically straight, but can be irregular or wild on some pieces. Canarywood is harvested in South America (from Panama down to southern Brazil).

Weight – 5.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Canarywood, Canary

Working Properties – Easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though some tearout can occur during planing on pieces with wild or irregular grain. Turns, glues and finishes well.

Durability – Rated as very durable in regard to decay resistance, as well as being resistant to termite and marine borer attack.

Uses – construction lumber, railroad crossties, flooring, veneers, boat-building, furniture, cabinetry, and turned items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 FAS1F RWL KD
Cocobolo 

Cocobolo

(Dalbergia retusa)

One of today’s most prized lumbers for its outstanding color and figure; yet also one of the most notorious for being difficult to glue, and it’s tendency to cause allergic reactions in woodworkers. Cocobolo can be seen in a kaleidoscope of different colors, ranging from yellow, orange, red, and shades of brown with streaks of black or purple. Sapwood is typically a very pale yellow. Colors are lighter when freshly sanded/cut, and darken with age. Timbers are harvested in Central America

Weight – 5.0lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Cocobolo, Cocobola

Working Properties – Due to the high oil content found in this wood, it can occasionally cause problems with gluing. Also, the wood’s color can bleed into surrounding wood when applying a finish, so care must be taken on the initial seal coats not to smear the wood’s color/oils into surrounding areas. Tearout can occur during planing if interlocked grain is present; the wood also has a moderate blunting effect on cutting edges/tools due to its high density. Cocobolo has excellent turning properties.

Durability – Like most rosewoods, Cocobolo has natural oils that give it excellent resistance to decay.

Uses – fine furniture, musical instruments, turnings, and other small specialty objects.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • Random Blanks – Call for Info
Ebony – Macassar 

Ebony – Macassar

(Diospyros celebica)

Ebony is an exotic wood native to Western Africa. It is an extremely hard, dense, and heavy wood, with a very fine texture. Has a dramatic striped appearance, somewhat similar to Zebrawood. Light to reddish brown body with darker brown or black stripes. Has a very fine texture and small pores. The grain is usually straight, but can sometimes be interlocked.

Weight – 6.9lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Macassar Ebony

Working Properties – Tends to be rather difficult to work, due to its high density, blunting effect on cutters, and its occasionally interlocked grain. The wood is also prone to checking and splitting during drying, and drying defects are not uncommon. The wood is excellent for turnery.

Durability – Heartwood is rated as very durable in resistance to fungi decay, though it is reported to be susceptible to insect attack.

Uses – Occasionally made into veneer, it’s also used as high-end cabinetry, billiard cues, musical instruments, and other small specialty items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • Random Blanks – Call for Info
Osage Orange 

Osage Orange

(Maclura pomifera)

Osage Orange has a relatively low modulus of elasticity compared to its weight, (it’s somewhat flexible), which would explain why it is sometimes used for archery bows. The wood is also very stable, with little seasonal/environmental movement. One helpful characteristic that can help separate it from lookalikes such as Mulberry or Black Locust (besides being heavier) is that Osage Orange contains a water-soluble yellow dye, so putting shavings into water will turn the water yellow.

Weight – 5.9lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Osage Orange, Horse Apple, Hedge Apple, Bodark

Working Properties – Working this wood can be difficult due to its hardness and density, though it is reported to have little dulling effect on cutting edges. It turns well, and also takes stains, glues and finishes well.

Durability – Osage Orange is extremely durable and is considered to be one of the most decay resistant woods in North America.

Uses – fence posts, dye, archery bows, musical instruments, turnings, and other small specialty wood items.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • Call for availability
Padauk 

Padauk

(Pterocarpus soyauxii)

Padauk has a very unique reddish orange coloration. Unfortunately, this dramatic color is frequently lost due to improper or inadequate finishing. If finished properly, the orange color can be preserved for many years with little to no signs of degradation. Padauk is moderately heavy, strong, and stiff, with exceptional stability. It’s a popular hardwood among hobbyist woodworkers because of its unique color. Heartwood color can vary, ranging from a pale pinkish orange to a deep brownish red. Most pieces tend to start reddish orange when freshly cut, darkening substantially over time to a reddish/purplish brown. Padauk’s initial orange coloration can be preserved through various finishing procedures.

Weight – 4.6lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – African Padauk

Working Properties – Overall Padauk is easy to work; tearout may also occur during planing on quartersawn or interlocked grain. Padauk turns, glues, and finishes well.

Durability – Has excellent decay resistance, and is rated as durable to very durable. Padauk is also reported to be resistant to termites and other insects.

Uses – veneer, flooring, turned objects, musical instruments, furniture, tool handles, and other small specialty wood objects.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4, 6/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD
Pink Ivory 

Pink Ivory

(Berchemia zeyheri)

Pink Ivory ranges in color from a pale brownish pink, to a bright, almost neon pink, to a deep red. Typically the most valuable pieces of Pink Ivory are a vibrant pink. Pink Ivory can commonly be seen with a curly or fiddleback grain pattern, further enhancing its visual impact. Sapwood of Pink Ivory tends to be pale yellow to light brown, with a somewhat gradual demarcation from heartwood. Color changes in Pink Ivory (becoming faded or dull over time) can be problematic and are not fully understood.

Weight – 6.6lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Pink Ivory, Red Ivorywood

Working Properties – Pink Ivory has a pronounced blunting effect on cutting edges, and it’s fairly difficult to work in board form. Tearout can occur on figured or quartersawn sections during planing. Pink Ivory is much more common in applications involving carving or turning, and it turns and finishes well.

Durability – Rated as durable to very durable regarding decay resistance, Pink Ivory is said to have excellent weathering characteristics: though it is seldom used in applications where this would be an issue.

Uses – carving, veneers, inlay, knife handles, billiard cues, chessmen, and other turned objects.

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Rosewood – Amazon 

Rosewood – Amazon

(Berchemia zeyheri)

Amazon Rosewood is perhaps the closest replacement (visually) to the endangered and highly restricted Brazilian Rosewood. Yet because Amazon Rosewood’s dried weight (on average) exceeds 1,000 kg/m3—the weight of water—one of the simplest ways to distinguish between the two species is by a float test: Brazilian Rosewood (assuming it is dried to at least 12% EMC) will almost always float, whereas Amazon Rosewood will usually sink. Amazon Rosewood tends to be an orange or reddish brown, with darker contrasting streaks. Lighter yellowish sapwood is clearly demarcated from heartwood. Overall, Amazon Rosewood bears a close resemblance to Brazilian Rosewood, both on the facegrain and also the endgrain.

Weight – 6.8lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Amazon Rosewood

Working Properties – Amazon Rosewood can be fairly difficult to work on account of its density, which is very close to that of Cocobolo. (It also needs to be glued with care—as do most other true rosewoods.) Amazon Rosewood turns and finishes well, and can be polished to a high natural luster.

Durability – No data available, though being a dense rosewood, it’s most likely very durable.

Uses – knife scales, guitars (back/sides), pens, and other small turned objects.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • Call for Availablility
Tigerwood 

Tigerwood

(Astronium graveolens)

Goncalo Alves is commonly referred to as “Tigerwood” or “Brazilian Tigerwood” among flooring dealers. The wood has superb stiffness, strength, hardness, and durability. However, density and other mechanical properties can vary widely depending on the growing site and source region. The name “Jobillo” is sometimes used to refer to higher grades of Goncalo Alves among woodturners. Heartwood is typically a medium reddish brown with irregularly spaced streaks of dark brown to black. Color tends to darken with age. Grain can be straight, but is usually wavy or interlocked. Goncalo Alves has a fine, uniform texture with very small pores.

Weight – 6.2lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Goncalo Alves, Tigerwood, Jobillo

Working Properties – Tigerwood is generally not too difficult to work, despite its high density. Figured pieces with irregular grain can pose a challenge in planing and machining operations. Tigerwood can also have a moderate blunting effect on cutters. The wood is very resistant to moisture absorption, which can make it difficult to glue. Tigerwood turns and finishes well.

Durability – has excellent weathering properties, and is rated as very durable regarding decay resistance.

Uses – flooring, veneers, furniture, cabinetry, carving, turned objects, and other small wood specialty objects such as: pool cues, archery bows, knife handles, etc.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 FAS1F RWL KD
Wenge 

Wenge

(Millettia laurentii)

Heartwood is a very dark brown with black streaks. But unlike most other woods, Wenge is reported to become lighter when exposed to light. Has a straight grain and a coarse texture. Wenge also has very large pores that can present a challenge to fill if a perfectly smooth/leveled finish is desired. Wenge is harvested in Africa (Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zaire).

Weight – 5.7lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Wenge

Working Properties – Can be difficult to work with hand and power tools. Blunts tool edges. Can sand unevenly due to differences in density between light and dark areas. Can easily get splinters when handling this wood, which tend to go septic.

Durability – has excellent weathering properties, and is rated as very durable regarding decay resistance.

Uses – commonly used for flooring, tool handles, paneling, veneers and furniture.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD

Hardwood Plywood:

  • Only available in special order custom Architectural Panels. Call for more information
Zebrawood 

Zebrawood

(Millettia laurentii)

Zebrawood is strong and stiff, with a fairly high density. Stability is below average for a tropical exotic wood. Heartwood is a light brown or cream color with dark blackish brown streaks vaguely resembling a zebra’s stripes. Depending on whether the wood is flatsawn or quartersawn, the stripes can be either chaotic and wavy (flatsawn), or somewhat uniform (quartersawn). Has a fairly coarse texture and open pores. Grain is usually wavy or interlocked.

Weight – 5.4lbs/BF – Kiln Dried to 12% MC

Common Names – Zebrawood, Zebrano

Working Properties – The wood saws well, but can be very difficult to plane or surface due to the prevalence of interlocking grain. Tearout is common. Zebrawood glues and finishes well, though a pore filler may be desired for the large open pores of the wood’s grain.

Durability –Heartwood is rated as durable and is also resistant to insect damage.

Uses – frequently quartersawn and used as veneer. Other uses include: tool handles, furniture, boatbuilding, and skis.

Available Products:

Hardwood Lumber:

  • 4/4 & 8/4 FAS1F RWL KD

Measuring Hardwoods

Measuring Hardwoods

All hardwoods are measured using a “board foot” increment score. One board foot or “BF” is 4/4 x 12" x 12" of surface measure.

The board footage of a piece is determined by measuring thickness x width (inches) x length (feet) divided by 12. Rounding off to the nearest whole number

Example: 6"X8′X1"÷12=4BF

Other Examples:

12" x 12′ x 1" ÷12 = 12 BF 6" x 16′ x 5/4" ÷12 = 10 BF

  • Measurement is based on thickness of lumber prior to surfacing.

 

MEASURING WITH A BOARD RULE

  • Place the rule on the right edge of the board approximately 1/3 of the length up from the narrow end.
  • Read to the right edge of the board, on the line indicating the length of the board. This is for board feet in lumber 1" thick and less. If the board is 8′ long, read the 16′ scale and divide by 2
Example: 12′ length = 6 BF 10′ length = 5 BF
 
Table


Grading Hardwoods

Grading Hardwoods

General Scope

This guide is designed to encourage the reader to become familiar with the grading rules for hardwood lumber established by the National Hardwood Lumber Association. The following illustrations are examples of the range in appearance that the buyer may expect to receive when purchasing each grade. An effort was made to show the maximum and minimum clear yield for each grade. Each picture shows the “worst” side of the board since hardwood lumber is graded from the poor face.

Introduction To Grading

With some exceptions, hardwood lumber is graded on the basis of the size and number of cuttings (pieces) which can be obtained from a board when it is cut up and used in the manufacture of a hardwood product such as furniture, flooring, or architectural millwork. Usually the buyer intends to use only the clear (defect free) material in a board, so a higher grade would have a larger area of clear wood.

Because the grading rules are based on the yield of clear wood, many of the beautiful, natural characteristics which appear in a board are not included in the calculation of the yield. Often, the natural beauty and real bargains are not found in the most expensive grade of lumber. The keen buyer who will examine the #1 and #2A grades can discover that they may "yield" the prize pieces. The following pages display drawings of typical boards representing three of the commonly used NHLA standard grades in several species of lumber.

Basic Yield for FAS

FAS (First and Seconds) – The FAS grade will provide the user with long, wide, clear cuttings. Best suited for high quality furniture, interior trim, millwork, and solid wood mouldings. The FAS grade includes a range of boards which yield from 83 1⁄3% (10⁄12ths) to 100% clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 7′ long or 4" wide by 5′ long.

Note: Diagrams show two examples of the minimum clear yield (unshaded area) needed to make each grade. The shaded area contains defects and is not used in calculating the yield, although users may very well crosscut and rip the lumber in a different pattern and use portions of the board in the shaded area.

 
FAS1F or Selects - In FAS1F ("FAS one Face") and Selects, the grade is established using both faces of the board. The best face, must meet the requirements for FAS, and the reverse side must essentially grade No. 1. FAS1F and Selects are virtually the same grade, except for minimum width and length. The minimum board size for Selects is 4" x 6′; and for FAS1F it is 6" x 8′.
 

Basic Yield for No. 1 Grade

No. 1 – Will provide the user with clear cuttings of medium length and width. Best suited forfurniture, cabinets, and a multitude of solid wood manufactured products. The No. 1 grade includes a range of boards which will yield from 66 2⁄3% (8⁄12ths) to 83 1⁄3% (10⁄12ths) clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 3′ long or 4" x 2′.

 

Basic Yield for No. 2A Grade

No. 2A – Will provide the user with short, narrow clear cuttings economically priced, for use in unexposed furniture frames, picture frames, cabinet rails and frames, parquet or strip flooring, and many other smaller solid wood components. The No. 2A grade includes a range of boards which will yield from 50% (6⁄12ths) to 66 2/3% (8⁄12ths) clear wood in cuttings at least 3" wide by 2′ long.

* Excerpted from NHLA An Illustrated Guide to Hardwood Lumber Grades.

       

 

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